Eta Aquarids meteor shower will light up the sky tonight and early tomorrow. Photo: EarthSky
Eta Aquarids meteor shower will light up the sky tonight and early tomorrow. Photo: EarthSky

Despite some possible clouds, favorable viewing conditions are in store for the Yucatán Peninsula in time for the peak of the Eta Aquarid meteor shower tonight and early tomorrow morning.

The annual Eta Aquarids occur due to Earth moving through the debris of Halley’s Comet and enter the Earth’s atmosphere at the astonishing speed of 148,000 mph. Although Halley’s Comet is visible only once every 75 years, the meteor shower it created is an annual event. But Halley’s Comet won’t be visible again until 2061.

The shower’s peak lasts from the evening hours of Tuesday, May 5, into the predawn hours of Wednesday, but meteors can still be seen several days after the peak. Up to 60 shooting stars per hour are expected.

Astronomy fans who will encounter inclement weather or cloudy skies can view Slooh’s live broadcast of the meteor shower on the night of May 5.

Viewers can look anywhere in the sky to catch a glimpse of the meteors and the best time to observe will be an “hour or two” before dawn.

Sources: Diario de Yucatán, AOL News/AccuWeather