Yucatecan voters were more motivated than the average citizen to head to the polls. Photo: Getty
Yucatecan voters were more motivated than the average citizen to head to the polls. Photo: Getty

Yucatecan participation in Sunday’s elections was at 62.8 percent, well above the national average of 51 percent, according to report by the National Electoral Institute (INE).

The leader of the National Chamber of Industry (Canacintra), Mario Can Marín, said that although there were attempts to tarnish the electoral process, citizens responded to the call to vote.

Contrast this with the voter turnout for some important races north of the border. In Philadelphia, just about 27 percent of registered voters in May went to the polls to give Jim Kenney a landslide victory in the city’s Democratic mayoral primary. In Los Angeles, 23 percent showed up in 2013 to elect Mayor Eric Garcetti. Even New York’s high-profile 2013 election, in which liberal Mayor Bill de Blasio prevailed, just 26 percent of registered voters to cast a ballot, the lowest turnout since 1953. 

Presidential elections in the U.S. draw higher numbers. In 2012 voter turnout was at 57.5 percent, compared to 62.3% who voted in 2008. Voters in Mexico came for a midterm election, however, deciding 500 seats in Congress; nine governorships and 1,532 local contests, including a mayoral race in Mérida. The PAN candidate, Mauricio Vila Dosal, won a three-year term.

Source: Sipse, Washington Post

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