Trans child in Yucatan allowed official gender change

A transgender 12-year-old was allowed to change the gender on his birth certificate. Photo: La Jornada Maya
A transgender 12-year-old was allowed to change the gender on their birth certificate. Photo: La Jornada Maya

In the state where marriage equality has been denied twice, courts have allowed an adult and a 12-year-old transgender person to officially change their gender identities.

Two new amparo rulings were issued by the Second and First District Courts, allowing modifications to the petitioners’ birth certificates, La Jornada Maya reports.

“Given the refusal of the authorities, specifically the legislative ones, to carry out the reforms aimed at recognizing the rights of LGBTTTI people, in a clear example of institutional violence, these sentences represent the evidence that the recognition of the rights for a historically discriminated group is an unavoidable obligation that must be exempt from any religious or moral criteria without support,” according to a joint statement from rights groups Indignación and Unasse A.C., who presented the cases to the judicial system.

 

The Yucatan Civil Registry had previously determined that it was not appropriate to change the sex in the official records without a court judgment.

“This resolution is of vital importance because it not only represents one of the first cases at the national and Latin American level where a judge orders the change of the birth certificate of a transgender child, but also makes visible a group especially vulnerable and historically excluded as it is that of trans children, with which it is expected that with this sentence the door will be opened so that the necessary reforms and adaptations in public policy are established that allow the free development of the personality of transgender children,” the civil associations stated about the case involving the un-named minor.

In the second case, the First District Court sided with a transgender man who also faced similar resistance.

In both cases, activists argued that the gender change falls under the right to human dignity.

Source: La Jornada Maya

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