Traffic into Chicxulub backs up as dozens of residents form their own blockade. Photo: Sipse

As residents in one coastal town took it upon themselves to create a blockade, two more coronavirus cases were registered in Yucatan Saturday, bringing the official count to 63.

It was a grim 24 hours nationally as 19 patients died from COVID-19, the highest number in one day, bringing Mexico’s coronavirus fatalities to 79. Mexico has counted 1,890 coronavirus cases so far.

Yucatan Gov. Mauricio Vila Dosal ordered anyone in public places to wear a face mask to prevent infecting others.

Since the health contingency began in Yucatan, 364 suspected instances of Covid-19 coronavirus have reduced to 63 confirmed cases. Of those, most have recovered or have mild symptoms, but seven patients still require hospitalization and total isolation; two have died. The official numbers don’t include two travelers returning from Canada and Peru, respectively, who are still under hospital care.

A British woman, who was a passenger on a cruise ship, tested positive, but has mild symptoms and is isolated in a hospital room.

The age range of confirmed cases is from 17 to 78 years.

Residents in the Chicxulub area on Saturday night attempted to block Meridanos and second-home owners access to the port town.

They argue that visitors should stay in the state capital or their place of origin due to the health emergency.

The Progreso police, the Ministry of Public Security and the National Guard intervened to lift the makeshift blockade and created an official checkpoint to screen motorists. Tourists and part-time residents were asked to turn around.

The state government said that people are not legally prohibited from going to their beach house, but say it is better that they stay put for now.

Boats and a State Police helicopter have also been deployed on the coast, halting pleasure boats, jet skis and any other recreational activity.

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