Pitaya is in bloom; more farmers needed

Officials are aiming to increase pitaya production to expand exports, benefiting rural farmers. Photo: Getty
Officials are aiming to increase pitahaya production to expand exports, benefiting rural farmers. Photo: Getty
Officials are aiming to increase pitahaya production to expand exports, benefiting rural farmers. Photo: Getty

The backyard of practically every rural Mayan family in Quintana Roo grows dragon fruit, known locally as pitaya. Now, production of the popular fruit is growing, and so are exports.

With an investment of four million pesos, about 100 farmers will join the 600 already cultivating crops that will be marketed to foreign countries.

In 2014, the 400 tons of pitaya generated close to 90 million pesos to the local economy.
Sales are made through a company in Oxkutzcab, Yucatán.

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But to expand to new markets, production needs to increase to fill orders, and the government wants at least 800 hectares of crops in use.

Despite its exotic appearance, its taste is mild, compared to a kiwifruit or pear.

Source: Sipse

 

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