Music Palace construction almost done, but opening delayed

The Music Palace is 90 percent complete. Behind it is a 17th-century heritage site, the Church of the Third Order. Photo: State press office

Mérida, Yucatán — El Palacio de la Música’s construction is 90 percent done, but the project won’t really be complete until all its equipment is delivered and installed by March 2018, state officials announced.

The state-run Music Palace will feature a 400-seat concert hall, a museum, academic library and classrooms.

It will be high-tech throughout, right down to a hologram of famed balladeer Armando Manzanero, who recently gave a concert on the Plaza Grande.

Sponsored
 

It will be the only institution of its kind in Mexico, and it will be in the heart of the Centro Histórico on Calle 58 and Calle 59, behind the Church of the Third Order.

In spite of the delay, the state cultural authorities are planning artistic programs that will begin in March. A staple will be Yucatecan trova performed almost daily on the terrace.

There are already agreements with some states, such as Puebla, to bring the best of their regional music to the new space.

State officials tour the nearly finished Music Palace on Monday.

All this was announced Monday when Gov. Rolando Zapata Bello toured the site with the secretary of culture and arts, Roger Metri Duarte.

In the museum area, a piano that was owned by Judith Pérez Romero, founder of Las Maya International, will be “played” by another hologram. This one will resemble Agustín Lara (1897-1970), the famous composer of “Granada” and “Solamente Una Vez (You Belong To My Heart).”

Sponsored
 

The main entrance will face Calle 58, with ticket booths and a cafeteria. The main concert hall will be on the second level and include a recording studio.

A rendering of Mérida’s new Music Palace. Photo: CONACULTA

The 322-million-peso El Palacio de la Música will have spaces for formal musical training and plans to offer music degrees.

A new space for pedestrians is planned between the modernist new building and its neighboring 17th-century church. Previously, electric transformers made it impossible to access the space between the church and the former state legislative building.

Source: Diario de Yucatán

Comments