Mototaxi ‘anarchy’ in Hunucmá to be addressed

Motortaxis are abundant in Hunucmá. Photo: Diario de Yucatán
Motortaxis are abundant in Hunucmá. Photo: Diario de Yucatán

Hunucmá, Yucatán — The city may be Yucatán’s next big industrial center, but much of the traffic here is made up of small, basic motortaxis, or mototaxis.

Most of the mototaxistas are unregistered and clog the streets, which is something that Mayor José Alberto Padrón Romero will discuss with directors of the Security, Transport, Urban Development and Governance.

The municipality is laying the foundation to regulate over 1,000 taxi drivers, said Transportation Director Martín Argáez García, who bemoaned the “anarchy that prevails in this service.”

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Hunucmá officially has 484 mototaxis, but another 800 are unregistered, he said, making it difficult for the municipality to control the number of vehicles on the streets.

Enforcing regulations and registration will decrease the surplus in motorcycle taxis, he said. To get a legal permit, drivers have to have all their papers in orders and pass a safety inspection.

He indicated that at the meeting they will also propose plans to improve roads, another problem in this city.

A week ago, a mototaxi driver named Yani Efraín Chan Caamal, 20, died in a crash involving another mototaxi.

In social networks, citizens suggest driver education, banning minors from getting behind the wheel and enforcing speed limits.

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Growing industry

Hunucmá, roughly 25 km west of Mérida on the way to Sisal or Celestún, makes headlines for its emerging industrial zone, where Modelo built a massive brewery.

More investment is coming. Around 3.8 billion pesos is budgeted in the next 10 months for four projects here: a cardboard factory, a chicken-nugget plant that will export to the U.S., a feed plant to supply area pig farms and a logistics company that will work with Modelo.

The state economic development director also announced the start-up of two more maquiladoras in the state in the near future. Those are assembly or processing factories in Mexico run by a foreign company and exporting its products back to its home country without paying tariffs.

Hunucmá is also in close proximity to Umán’s new railroad operations center, a move toward efficiency in industrial Yucatán.

Sources: Diario de Yucatán, Sipse

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