Hotels on Peninsula outperform the rest of Mexico

City Express Junior will open its second Mérida operation in October.

The Yucatán Peninsula is the only region in Mexico to have increased hotel occupancy in the third quarter of 2017.

Business at peninsular hotels inched up slightly (0.3 percent), while Mexico City reported the largest decline in occupancy (4.4 to 65.5 percent).

The numbers aren’t as bad as expected considering a new report from Bloomberg citing a 10 percent occupancy dip this year in Cancun and the loss of 35,000 bookings in Cabo San Lucas in light of U.S. State Department travel warnings for the country.

Smith Travel Research, a data company based in Hendersonville, Tenn., reported Friday that compared with Q3 2016, occupancy in Q3 2017 dipped 1.6 percent to 63.1 percent.

STR that tracks supply and demand data for multiple market sectors, including the global hotel industry.

“Group tourism automatically went down the moment the warning hit,” Carlos Gosselin, head of the hotel association for Cancun and Puerto Morelos, told Bloomberg. “Many insurance companies likely won’t even consider offering coverage in areas under advisory, hurting conventions and events in the area.”

The report added that Mexico is reinforcing security in popular tourist spots to get the State Department to revise its views, and companies including Hilton and Marriott are spending millions to make guests feel safer.

In Los Cabos, local and federal authorities are teaming up with hotels, timeshare companies and the airport operator to step up the area’s security. The group is spending US$50 million to increase surveillance cameras to cover the 20-mile main stretch that includes hotels, restaurants and public beaches.

Source: Hotels Magazine

Comments