Friends honor Yucatecan killed in U.S. by police

Luis Demetrio Góngora Pat memorial
Luis Demetrio Góngora Pat was a homeless Yucatecan gunned down by police in San Francisco, Calif.
Luis Demetrio Góngora Pat memorial
Luis Demetrio Góngora Pat was a homeless Yucatecan gunned down by police in San Francisco, Calif.

The body of a Yucatecan man shot dead by police in San Francisco, Calif., has been brought home to his home village of Teabo.

But he won’t soon be forgotten in the Bay Area, where friends have raised over $3,000 to help his family and to organize a justice campaign.

Luis Demetrio Góngora Pat, evicted from his Mission District apartment and living on the streets, was gunned down by police called on reports of a man wielding a knife. Friends and neighbors refuse to believe officials accounts stating that officers killed Góngora in self-defense.

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At the town hall meeting called by Chief Greg Suhr to discuss the killing of Luis Gongora, 200 angry people repeatedly called for Suhr’s firing. The photo of Luis Gongora was provided by his family in Mexico. Photo: Lola M. Chavez, Mission Local
At the town hall meeting called by Chief Greg Suhr to discuss the killing of Luis Gongora, 200 angry people repeatedly called for Suhr’s firing. The photo of Luis Gongora was provided by his family in Mexico. Photo: Lola M. Chavez, Mission Local

GoFundMe drive has surpassed its $3,000 goal to aid his family in Yucatán, and to organize a “Justice4LuisGóngora” campaign.

The expenses of the repatriation of his body were covered by the Mexican Consulate, the Institute for the Development of Maya Culture (INDEMAYA) and the City of Teabo.

Friends spoke to media about how they perceived Góngora’s character.

Góngora
Góngora

“He was my best friend for about a decade,” said Matthew Castro, who described Góngora as kind-hearted, selfless, and docile.

“He showed me how to work, how to wash dishes. He was a good coworker,” said Andres Ek, who worked with him at a drive-in restaurant for 11 years. “He was a great worker. He didn’t how to read, he didn’t know any of that—same as me.”

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Neighbors also knew Góngora as the “soccer guy,” who could always be found on Shotwell Street kicking and bouncing his ball.

Góngora is survived by his spouse, three grown children and his elderly parents in Yucatán. Luis is also survived by brothers and cousins in San Francisco. Family called him Luis or by his nickname, Sapo.

Source: El Tecolote

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