Walmart on the Paseo de Montejo in Merida. Photo: Yelp

Merida, Yucatan — Confusion continues over how to comply with city, state and private regulations meant to control the spread of coronavirus.

Yucatan’s lawmakers first approved strict travel measures that made it illegal for drivers to carry a passenger in their own vehicles. But an Uber or taxi could have one passenger, in the back seat and wearing a face mask.

Residents balked at the double-standard. Drivers couldn’t shuttle someone they sleep with, or are in contact with all day long at home, but a stranger could.

The rule was not enforced at checkpoints, drivers indicated on social media, and MID CityBeat later reported that the rule was relaxed, giving Uber drivers the same latitude as private drivers.

Residents also cried “discrimination” when word spread that supermarkets and big box stores were turning away customers over 60 to protect more vulnerable groups from infection. Notices were posted online, in parking lots or garages and at entrances.

But even then, the rule appeared to be enforced differently depending on the branch, or which manager was on duty. Facebook comments indicated some over-60s got in to Walmart or Chedraui with no problem. Others were “carded” or turned away.

Customers with white hair appeared to be profiled by greeters. Lists were shared with advice on where older shoppers won’t be stopped.

Walmart set aside “senior hours” from 7-10 a.m. and Soriana from 9-11, but shoppers complained online that store allowed everyone to enter.

Are residents allowed to go for walks? During business hours, pedestrians may be confronted by a police officer. Telling the police you are headed to a bank or supermarket has been sufficient, residents reported.

Editor’s note: YEL received several messages since Saturday asking us to nail it down and share a definitive list of which stores were letting in which people at what times. We never were able to compile a reliable list because enforcement was inconsistent.

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